Skip to main content

About your Search

20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
sees a cut in spending. >> street battles in tunisia following the funeral of the slain opposition leader chokri belaid. >> millions are in asia heading home to celebrate the year of the snake. for the first time in the history of the european union, the long-term budget will be cut. 27 eu leaders meeting in brussels have agreed to a final budget during a second summit arranged especially to do so. we will go live to brussels for the latest in just a moment. >> that's right -- the drastically reduced seven-year budget is worth 959 billion euros and was hammered out after two days of nearly round-the- clock negotiations and is far less than the just over $1 trillion euros -- and the one trillion euros the commission had originally proposed. >> german chancellor angela merkel went into the talks saying she was confident the agreement would be reached. in the end, the 27 member states came up with a compromise that even british prime minister david cameron welcomed as a good deal for britain >> it is perhaps nobody's perfect budget, but there is a lot in it for everybody. obviously, y
in the next half hour -- them of political unrest in tunisia after a leading secular politician is assassinated in front of his home. >> the german education minister is stripped of her document for playing it -- her doctorate for plagiarism, and the opposition calls for her resignation. >> the political crisis in tunisian deepened dramatically tonight following the assassination of a top opposition leader and the violent unrest that has followed in the wake of his killing. troops have been deployed in a number of locations to restore order. >> the killing of the prominent secular politician has sparked protests across the country. supporters flooded the streets of tunis and other cities. there are reports of barricades being erected in clashes with police. >> news of the assassination sparked protests in several tunisian cities. in the capital, thousands of angry protesters followed the ambulance carrying belaid's body. many blame the islamists, an accusation the party denies. >> people know that the criminals are directly linked to the head of the party. >> all these islamist
the dozens of abandoned airplanes at the country's airport. >> the ruling party of tunisia has projected its own prime minister's decision to dissolve the government. there is a homecoming of shokri belaid's remains. they predict the dissolution of parliament announced by its own prime minister. the assassination has sparked mass protests in several major cities. now this report. >> the people here are pretty much aware of the implications of the assassination and the uncertainty that looms over the country. this is by the political establishment yesterday had a quick fix the problem. prime minister hamdi jebali said that he offered the technocratic government, refusing -- saying the offer to dissolve the government. the party says that it rejects a technocratic offer and they intend to stay in power. the other opposition parties want to include everyone in the talks and they don't want a democratic government. >> an inquiry by australia's top criminal investigation leaders has found widespread doping in professional sport. links to organized crime and the possibility of a match fixing. scan
, for the last of those years, country director for morocco and tunisia. earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work which we will see john out, up in northern mali. very delighted to have him on our team at the africa center, as well as as a friend. also delighted to have another ,ld friend, dr. ricardo renÉ dr. of science at binghamton university on islam. he has been a colleague, i might mention that he and i are editing a book together on the north african revolutions. delighted to have him as a scholar of the region and a friend and our wives have become friends as well. it is in the family, so to speak. last but not least, this dr. is a political scientist and senior fellow at the middle east program of the carnegie endowment. and author of quite a number of works, some quite prescient in their timing on al qaeda. you have their biographical notes for fuller details. one thing not in the notes, i cannot resist mentioning that while there are few discussions of the crisis in mali going around washington, this will be the only one where the panel speakers includes individuals who have b
back into cities they wouldn't held. riots have broken out in tunisia after an official was shot dead. a leading member of the secular popular front party. he suffer is multiple gunshot wounds in the head and chest. the after the arab spring uprising in 2011. he said the culprit will be arrested. the murder sparked protests in tunis and around the country. tunisia has been gripped by instability and economic hardship. party leaders came to power making promises but they see problems before the arab spring. >>> executives seem happier with the recent economic climate. tell us what's changed. >> we've had a new government in japan and stock prices went higher. all of this seems to be working in the favor of boosting confidence for japan's manufacturing. orders for manufacture chinery third straight month. these factors encourage companies to increase their spending on plant and economic. cabinet officials said domestic firms place orders with machinery makers about $8 billion. the latest figure marks an increase of 2.8% in previous months in yen terms. this is much better than a negativ
. >> european leaders at loggerheads over the new budget. >> credit unit -- a general strike in tunisia as anger grows over the assassination of one of the nation's boldest critics. >> an unsettling report outlining doping across sports. the battle of the budget in brussels in shaping up to be very much a north/south confrontation with europe's rich northern countries calling for a further deep spending cuts. >> but in the south, countries like greece and spain say four years of austerity are enough. they are calling for spending to be eased to spur growth and create jobs. >> after it failed budget summit in november, stakes are high this time around for some kind of deal. >> british prime minister david cameron wants the eu to mend what he sees as its wasteful ways. he made his point by arriving on foot, not in a chauffeur-driven limousine. he went into the talks in a bullish mood. >> the numbers that were put forward were much too high. they need to come down, and if they do not, a to be a done deal. >> that puts him on a collision course with many other eu leaders who argue the block needs a
44 people were killed in clashes on friday. supporters of tunisia's governing party are staging a rally later today after mass protest over the assassination of an opposition politician. tens of thousands of people attend it had funeral on friday. and there were more clashes between protesters and police. the opposition blames the moderate islamist party for his assassination on wednesday. the slain politician was a strong critic of the islamists. as tunisia deals from the fallout, tensions are on the rise in egypt. protests took place across the country after hard line muslim clerics issued fat with as calling for secular and opposition leaders to be killed. protesters clashed outside the presidential pal as in cairo. dem stracors accused them of betraying and of favors islamists over secular combrists. french troops have been securing the town a day after they chased islamist fighters from one of their last remaining strongholds. the soldiers have been combing the town for militants and weaponry but malli is still far from secure. the president apologized on tv for an attack b
and that of former secretary of state hillary clinton. >> they insisted that the tunisia authorities did not have the evidence to keep him in custody. >> tunisias did not have a basis in their law to hold him. >> so they released him? >> they did. >> where is he? >> still in tunisia. >> it doesn't sound like a good system to work with partners. >> they work the way we do. >> f.b.i. interviewed him for two hours in december after weeks of delay and following the personal intervention of the republican senator lindsey graham. he seemed to minimize the suspect's release. claiming the u.s. case was weak. >> we didn't have anything on him either or we would have made point to tunisias to turn him over to us. >> two weeks earlier in the benghazi hearing, secretary clinton said she spoke with mueller about whether the government's case could be made public. >> director mueller and i spoke about this at some length. there was not an ability for evidence to be presented yet that was cape to believe be presented in open court. >> clinton said the tunisians promised to keep tabs on him. >> we have been assu
director in the office of the secretary of defense, and also country director for morocco and tunisia, and earlier in his career, did quite a bit of work, which i think you'll see brought out up 234 -- in northern mali including 30 trips in that region. ranging well, and delighted to have him on our team. another old friend, dr. ricardo, professor of political science and sociology and a corporation scholar on islam, ricardo, a good friend and colleague, and in the department of shameless self-promotion, i mentioned he and i are editing a book together in the north african revolution, but delighted to have him, and our wives have become friends as well. it's in the family so to speak. timely, last, but not least, dr. onwar, assistant professor of political science, and nonresident senior fellow at the carnegie endowment, and author of quite a number of works, some quite precious in their timing on al-qaeda in the islamic and its effects. you have their bigraphical notes for fuller details. i would note one thing not in the notes, and i can't resist mentioning that while there's few di
they did. he is still in tunisia. it shows the two nations are working with the rule of law, just like we do. >> we have someone who is a suspect in the potential attack on benghazi and did not give us access to him, and we don't have any information. >> we work with our partners across the board. when they can detain individuals according to their laws, we were to see if we have the ability to ask some questions, sometimes directly and sometimes indirectly. >> but the tunisian law did not allow them to hold them so they let them go? >> and we did not have anything on him, either. if we did, we would have made the point for them to turn them over to us. the cia should be able to lend its full expertise as it does right now in terms of and support a military interrogations', fbi, and foreign partner of the briefings. they do that on a regular basis. >> what is the best setting? a suspected terrorist is captured and we think we can obtain information from them, where the suggest they be taken? what is the right setting? >> there are many options. sometimes with foreign partners, they put th
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)